Tips for choosing your throwing axe

Are you looking for a good throwing axe or a tomahawk to throw? The axe throw is a lot of fun, sometimes even more fun than throwing a knife.

It gives you the same speed as a good throwing knife, but with more power. When you hear the “muffled sound” that a throwing axe makes when it reaches its target, it feels stronger and noisier than the “thud” that the knife does. It has more weight and length, giving it a much more brutal impact.

Selecting the right throwing axe or the good axe tomahawk that fits your size and strength can be a challenge. But first, let’s be completely honest with ourselves. Most people can launch just about any style and size of the tomahawk and plant it without a problem.

But you want more than a classic Tomahawk hatchet, don’t you? You want one that sinks every time. Am I mistaken?

That is the purpose of this article. If you are tall or small, male or female, adult or child, there are many things to consider when selecting a throwing axe.

I will present in this article the best-selling models that you can use to launch, and purchase recommendations.

Things to consider: my advice

Cold-Steel-Trench-Hawk

Unlike traditional axes, a throwing axe is designed as a combat weapon. Yes, you may well cut a tree with it but it also works to destroy doors, for hand-to-hand combat, and to throw. Many Tomahawks are used by the army since they are so flexible. You want an axe to throw made of solid materials. If it is made of poor quality steel, the axe can break if it hits a hard object or if it falls.

Dimensions and weights

For a tomahawk axe to throw, you would want to make sure that the weight and lengths are appropriate for you. Longer handles result in slower turns. Heavy models also result in slower rotations. Slower rotation can give beginners an easy way to adjust their throw.
They also provide a greater impact and can be projected farther than smaller sleeves. These things are also true for the knife throw.

tomhawk axe throwing

The handle must be of high quality. A slippery handle will not make you service when cutting or throwing. A sticky rubber grip will not last long and will block when you launch it. The right choice is the sleeved surrounded by paracord (parachute ropes (550 cord), the non-skid strip, or even the grooved metal.

Construction

Silk is the part of the blade that extends into the handle. It is rare to find an axe to throw with a whole silk (too heavy and not designed in this way by tradition). However, the point of connection between the silk and the handle must be resistant. Traditional axes have wooden handles that are just stuck in a hole in the axe. It’s not good to run because it can easily fall off. Throw axes usually have 3 screws in order to hold the head and handle together.

Steel

The metal of a tomahawk is usually stainless steel, but you can find some in carbon steel. Carbon steel is more resistant than stainless steel, so it will be durable longer; However, carbon steel rusts more easily than stainless steel. Stainless steel is “soft” (“soft”) compared to carbon and should not crack if it strikes a hard object.

Case

The case must also be of good quality. A blade with a bad quality holster is a catastrophe to come. The poor quality of a sheath will not protect the blade and may reduce its lifespan. The Cor-Ex, nylon and leather are good sheaths.

What is the best brand of throwing axe?

It’s a common question. There are some well-known brands, such as Cold Steel, SOG, Gerber, United cutlery, etc… This list could take forever. What brand is right for you? Well, it depends on you. Each brand has a price.

The best way to decide which brand is right for you might just be to try each of them yourself. However, the axes of Lancer Cold Steel, SOG and United cutlery are excellent recommendations.

 

 

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Tips for choosing your throwing axe
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Tips for choosing your throwing axe
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The Axe Throwing
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Updated: September 20, 2018 — 9:16 am

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